Large mobility modulation in ultrathin amorphous titanium oxide transistors


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  "created": "2020-10-27T01:19:34.504100+00:00", 
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      {
        "type": "Journal reference", 
        "citation": "N. Tiwale, A. Subramanian, Z. Dai, S. Sikder, J. T. Sadowski, C.-Y. Nam, Communications Materials 1, 94 (2020)", 
        "doi": "10.1038/s43246-020-00096-w", 
        "url": "https://doi.org/10.1038/s43246-020-00096-w"
      }
    ], 
    "id": "618", 
    "contributors": [
      {
        "familyname": "Tiwale", 
        "affiliations": [
          "Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, United States"
        ], 
        "givennames": "Nikhil"
      }, 
      {
        "familyname": "Subramanian", 
        "affiliations": [
          "Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States"
        ], 
        "givennames": "Ashwanth"
      }, 
      {
        "familyname": "Dai", 
        "affiliations": [
          "Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, United States"
        ], 
        "givennames": "Zhongwei"
      }, 
      {
        "familyname": "Sikder", 
        "affiliations": [
          "Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States"
        ], 
        "givennames": "Sayantani"
      }, 
      {
        "familyname": "Sadowski", 
        "affiliations": [
          "Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, United States"
        ], 
        "givennames": "Jerzy T."
      }, 
      {
        "email": "cynam@bnl.gov", 
        "familyname": "Nam", 
        "affiliations": [
          "Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, United States", 
          "Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States"
        ], 
        "givennames": "Chang-Yong"
      }
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    "status": "published", 
    "license": "Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International", 
    "version": 1, 
    "title": "Large mobility modulation in ultrathin amorphous titanium oxide transistors", 
    "doi": "10.24435/materialscloud:1t-g7", 
    "description": "Recently, ultrathin metal-oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) have shown very high on-off ratio and ultra sharp subthreshold swing, making them promising candidates for applications beyond conventional large-area electronics. While the on-off operation in typical TFTs results primarily from the modulation of charge carrier density by gate voltage, the high on-off ratio in ultrathin oxide TFTs can be associated with a large carrier mobility modulation, whose origin remains unknown. We investigate 3.5 nm-thick titanium oxide based ultrathin TFTs exhibiting 6-decade on-off ratio, predominantly driven by gate induced mobility modulation. The power law behavior of the mobility features two regimes, with a very high exponent at low gate voltages, unprecedented for oxide TFTs. We find that this phenomenon is well explained by the presence of high-density tail states near the conduction band edge, which supports carrier transport via variable range hopping. The observed two-exponent regimes reflect the bi-exponential distribution of the density of band-tail states. This improved understanding would be significant in fabricating high-performance ultrathin oxide devices.", 
    "_oai": {
      "id": "oai:materialscloud.org:618"
    }, 
    "mcid": "2020.146", 
    "conceptrecid": "617", 
    "keywords": [
      "amorphous semiconductor", 
      "titanium oxide", 
      "field-effect transistor", 
      "variable range hopping", 
      "mobility modulation"
    ], 
    "publication_date": "Nov 13, 2020, 10:49:14"
  }, 
  "updated": "2020-12-04T16:14:11.589773+00:00", 
  "id": "618"
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